Aroeira Vermelha: a Brazilian Plant

Aroeira is a tree also considered to be a medicinal plant when it comes to the species aroeira Vermelha, also called aroeira-da-praia, aroeira tame, cornice, aroeira-pepper, poivre-rose, almecegueira, lentisco or rasteira mole. Its scientific name is Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi , of the Anacardiaceae family and is native to South America, native of Brazil from Pernambuco to Mato Grosso do Sul and Rio Grande do Sul and also found in Uruguay, Argentina and Paraguay.

The medicinal plant should not be confused with wild or white mastic , other trees that, if consumed, cause allergic side effects, such as hives, edema and erythema. Aroeira can measure up to 10 meters in height and gives small flowers and red fruits, similar to small grapes. Its greatest means of consumption is through tea, but also by gargling, bathing or compresses. The parts used are the leaves, bark or seeds of the plant.

Aroeira Benefits

The mastic is used therapeutically to treat mainly gynecological and throat infections , such as syphilis, cough, bronchitis and fever. It is also used for arthritis, rheumatism, ulcers, heartburn, gastritis, diarrhea or cystitis.

This is done in folk medicine because the aroeira has astringent, balsamic, anti-inflammatory, antifungal and antibiotic, diuretic, tonic and healing properties It is also believed that it can be antidiarrheal, antileukorrheic and purgative, which helps in gastroenteritis both by bacteria, like Salmonella, and by fungi like Candida, or even by protozoa.

Balsamic function

In its balsamic function, its leaves are often used for external use in order to heal skin wounds , skin infections or erysipelas. Tea is made from its leaves and is applied in hot compresses to the affected region. Likewise, compresses are applied in cases of rheumatic diseases such as arthritis, tendon strain or sciatica and gout pain. You can use massages and hot baths in addition to compresses.

Tea

Tea, made in infusion or decoction, is more used to help treat diseases of the urinary tract and problems with digestive organs , such as diarrhea, cystitis, among others.

Creme

A last use is still made from the mastic cream commercialized, being indicated for skin infections in general, with antiseptic properties for superficial problems such as: pimples, mycoses and chilblains, allergies and inflammation of insect bites.

How to Make Aroma Tea

The most used part for mastic tea is the bark , and the other parts of the plant are used to prepare baths. For the internal use of tea, an infusion of mastic can be prepared, which is useful in stomach problems .

Add 100 grams of Aroeira bark powder, purchased from health food stores, for each liter of boiling water. It is possible to sweeten the infusion with a spoon of sugar or sweetener. The ideal is to take at least 3 tablespoons a day .

A decoction can also be made with 3 or 4 pieces of mastic peel, which is equivalent to 20 to 30 g, for each liter of water, for 15 minutes. After cooling, strain the solution and store it in the refrigerator. It can be consumed in up to one day.

External use

For external use, the tea can be used for mastic baths or massages in order to relieve symptoms of rheumatism and skin problems. To prepare the tea for bathing, 20 g to 25 g of mastic peels should be cooked in 1 liter of water, and wait for boiling for 5 minutes. After that, you can strain and wait for the infusion to be warm to bathe or apply to massages. The aroeira is not only suitable for those with very sensitive skin.

Cultural History of Aroeira

The aroeira was used in the colonial period by the Portuguese Jesuits who prepared the “Bálsamo das Missões”, famous in Brazil and abroad, with the resin of the tree. Also in the historical records is the use of aroeira in Candomblés religions jêje-nagôs, both the common tree and the aroeira-Vermelha, which is known by the names of “àjóbi oilé” and “àjóbi pupa”.

The use in these religions is also medicinal, for wounds, inflammation and as anti-rheumatic, or in use during the rituals of sacrificing quadruped animals in ebós, and in shaking.

It is believed to be a plant associated with the Orixás, as its characteristics would correspond to those of Ossain, Ogun and Exu, in the classifications of the mythical narratives of Candomblé. In the myths it is said that in the morning the aroeira belongs to Ogun and in the afternoon it belongs to Exu. And for Ossain, the mastic is used in his clothing.

See also: Iron Supplement

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My name is Dr. Alexis Hart I am 38 years old, I am the mother of 3 beautiful children! Different ages, different phases 16 years, 12 years and 7 years. In love with motherhood since always, I found it difficult to make my dreams come true, and also some more after I was already a mother.

Since I imagined myself as a mother, in my thoughts everything seemed to be much easier and simpler than it really was, I expected to get pregnant as soon as I wished, but it wasn’t that simple. The first pregnancy was smooth, but my daughter’s birth was very troubled. Joana was born in 2002 with a weight of 2930kg and 45cm, from a very peaceful cesarean delivery but she had already been born with congenital pneumonia due to a broken bag not treated with antibiotics even before delivery.

Dr. Alexis Hart

My name is Dr. Alexis Hart I am 38 years old, I am the mother of 3 beautiful children! Different ages, different phases 16 years, 12 years and 7 years. In love with motherhood since always, I found it difficult to make my dreams come true, and also some more after I was already a mother.Since I imagined myself as a mother, in my thoughts everything seemed to be much easier and simpler than it really was, I expected to get pregnant as soon as I wished, but it wasn’t that simple. The first pregnancy was smooth, but my daughter’s birth was very troubled. Joana was born in 2002 with a weight of 2930kg and 45cm, from a very peaceful cesarean delivery but she had already been born with congenital pneumonia due to a broken bag not treated with antibiotics even before delivery.

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