How to Remove a Baby’s Pacifier – Effectively and Without Suffering

When talking about pacifiers, the discussion never comes to a single consensus. There are those who defend its benefits and there are those who fervently condemn its practice. But what is difficult even for some parents is how to remove a child’s pacifier.

An Interesting Fact

The sucking reflex appears in the baby in the eighteenth week of uterine life. It is a reflex of survival, since the baby needs to suck to feed. That is why the pacifier is so well accepted by most babies.

Pacifiers Are Not Mean

I think it is important to start the article today with this reminder – pacifiers are not evil! They are not dangerous. In fact, they may even reduce the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) . However, it is important to avoid offering them to the baby until the breastfeeding relationship is established, if you are breastfeeding (or planning).

They get a bad reputation at times, but in fact, pacifiers can be a useful tool in the effort to help babies sleep well . Pacifiers can be an instrument to help the baby to calm itself without help from the parents, and can decrease nighttime awakening (that is, unless the baby is constantly asking the mother to come and put the pacifier in her mouth after she has dropped down).

So, let us remember that, just like other objects benefit the baby’s and child’s sleep, the pacifier is not a problem until it really becomes a problem.

If it fits perfectly into the baby’s or child’s life (and perfectly into the mother’s), then don’t feel pressured into how to remove a child’s pacifier.

But what if it doesn’t? What if the baby wakes up 10 times a night to replace the pacifier after it fell out of his mouth? What if the mother is tired of buying pacifiers everywhere she goes, just so that her child doesn’t have to be without one?

If the child stops eating or talking because he has a pacifier in his mouth. If that’s the case, it may be time to give up the pacifier forever and learn how to remove a child’s pacifier.

The Ideal Age to Take a Baby’s Pacifier

This is a big question for parents whose little ones are excited about the “beak”. Unfortunately, there is no magic age. Some parents learn how to remove a child’s pacifier when their babies are 5 or 6 months old ; others let children use a pacifier until they are 3 or 4 years old.

In fact, there is no right or wrong, black or white when it comes to pacifiers. It’s like putting a baby’s sleeping routine on – babies and toddlers learn to sleep in different ways, and at different ages.

But let’s see a general truth when it comes to taking a baby’s pacifier, the sooner you do it, the easier it will be . The same is true for the sleep routine, and for so many things associated with raising children.

Up to 1 year

For this reason, pediatricians generally recommend taking a baby’s pacifier before the first year. The idea is that, before 12 months, the baby did not have the time (or the cognitive ability) to form a deep attachment to a pacifier, so moving it away may not be so difficult .

The same does not happen if you try to take a baby’s pacifier around 18 months . This child probably created strong feelings of attachment to his pacifier.

Attempting to remove it then will probably be much more difficult than if you had done it previously. It is not impossible, of course, but it is full of tears and anger on the part of the child (and perhaps on your part, too).

In addition, depending on how old this child has been with a pacifier, there is a risk of dental problems as well.

Tips on How to Take the Pacifier More Peacefully

There is no “right way” to do this. There are some strategies that can be used in creating a plan to remove the pacifier.

If you are removing a pacifier from a baby less than 12 months old, you probably won’t need to use creativity . You will only be able to throw it away and then prepare yourself for some difficult nights, without sleeping and some short and restless naps.

If you are removing a pacifier from an older child, you need to be a little creative. Of course, you can simply get rid of the pacifiers when the child is not looking, and make the withdrawal suddenly and abruptly.

Strategies for removing a pacifier from children:

Start a Countdown

Similar to a calendar, you can start a visual countdown to when the pacifier will go away. Your child will be able to easily see how much time they will have to use the pacifier, learning to deal with the separation.

Experience A Slow Transition

With a slow transition, it is possible to remove dependence on the pacifier gradually. Most parents who use this process allow it to be used only at bedtime, when their child is sick, or feeling bad. In a short time they are able to take out the pacifier permanently.

Seize the Opportunities

Identify the signs that your child is ready to drop the pacifier and enjoy the moment. During a cold, it is common for the child to reject the pacifier, as he needs to breathe through his mouth because of a stuffy nose.

If this happens, remove the pacifiers from view and wait. When your child asks for a pacifier, do not give it immediately. It may be that he quits the habit naturally.

Put the Pacifier in a Stuffed Animal

Take the pacifier to build a bear and have it sewed on a special pet. Or you can put it inside a toy that your child already has at home.

This way, the pacifier can stay with the child at the same time that he is abandoning the regular use of the pacifier. This can keep the bond and comfort close without her using the pacifier any longer.

Visit of the Pacifier Fairy

Like the tooth fairy, the pacifier fairy comes and takes the pacifiers and leaves a gift or money instead. This would be a good option for a child who is old enough to understand what the Tooth Fairy and Pacifier Fairy is.

Reward Table

Create a reward chart or sticker to monitor your child’s progress. Every time he is without a pacifier, he receives a label or reward to celebrate.

If you are going to reward the child for not using a pacifier, prefer games, outings, privileges, or simple goodies, do not give sweets to him in place of the pacifier.

Pacifier in Balloon

Another way to say goodbye is to send the pacifier in a balloon. Tie the pacifier to the string of a helium balloon and inform your child that the pacifier is going away. You can tell them that the pacifier will have extraordinary adventures in a new country or go to another baby that needs it.

Replacement Toy

Give your child a new toy to replace the pacifier. Make sure that he understands that he needs to exchange it for the new toy and that the pacifier will not come back. Try to choose a toy that will keep your attention for a long time, rather than something that it will quickly forget.

Have a “Goodbye” Party

Celebrate by having a “goodbye” party for the pacifier. Use the child’s birthday to promote the party. Reinforce the idea that she is completing another year and is becoming “big”, and older children do not use a pacifier, they love to feel more grown up.

Read Books

There are many books that can present the idea of ​​leaving the pacifier. Of all the strategies presented above, starting with books is undoubtedly the most suitable.

Limiting or taking away the use of a pacifier on your baby or child can actually be quite traumatic for you as much as it is for them. So it is important to do it with a lot of calm and patience .

See Also: Give a Pacifier or Not – Here’s the Question

Dr. Alexis Hart
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My name is Dr. Alexis Hart I am 38 years old, I am the mother of 3 beautiful children! Different ages, different phases 16 years, 12 years and 7 years. In love with motherhood since always, I found it difficult to make my dreams come true, and also some more after I was already a mother.

Since I imagined myself as a mother, in my thoughts everything seemed to be much easier and simpler than it really was, I expected to get pregnant as soon as I wished, but it wasn’t that simple. The first pregnancy was smooth, but my daughter’s birth was very troubled. Joana was born in 2002 with a weight of 2930kg and 45cm, from a very peaceful cesarean delivery but she had already been born with congenital pneumonia due to a broken bag not treated with antibiotics even before delivery.

Dr. Alexis Hart

My name is Dr. Alexis Hart I am 38 years old, I am the mother of 3 beautiful children! Different ages, different phases 16 years, 12 years and 7 years. In love with motherhood since always, I found it difficult to make my dreams come true, and also some more after I was already a mother.Since I imagined myself as a mother, in my thoughts everything seemed to be much easier and simpler than it really was, I expected to get pregnant as soon as I wished, but it wasn’t that simple. The first pregnancy was smooth, but my daughter’s birth was very troubled. Joana was born in 2002 with a weight of 2930kg and 45cm, from a very peaceful cesarean delivery but she had already been born with congenital pneumonia due to a broken bag not treated with antibiotics even before delivery.

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